Dear Canada Diaries

Hey everyone! Now this post is going to be a bit different then what you all are used to. Normally I would show you a picture of the book I read, tell you a bit about it, and then rate it. But today I am going to tell you about a series, not at all related, but at the same time, has a lot to do with each other. It is called the 'Dear Canada' series.
Each book, and there are a lot of them, has a different writer, and a different story from the perspective of either a little girl or a little boy. From book to book they are in the form of a Diary from the children's point of view of events that changed Canada greatly.
The first one I read took place during the Halifax explosion, and described from the little girl's perspective how she loses her family, and how she suffers with her town.
There are others such as the Polio epidemic, the Flu Epidemic, The Titanic, The Underground Railroad, and so on.
If you love history, which I do very much, than this is a series you should read. The children give a good story about how it happened, using details that are true to the events that happened on those days. The stories are chilling, exciting, and saddening, all at the same time!
I do not know if you can read these books outside of Canada, because I haven't checked, but if you can I would say give them a try. I have heard nothing but good things about them from everyone who has read them.
For everyone I have read so far (6 of them) I have given them a 4 out of 5 star rating. The only one I had problems with was the Titanic one, and that was because the information was lacking. (I am a huge fan of everything Titanic, and have been since I was a little girl)
Give them a try if you get the chance, and I will see you all next Monday!
P.S Sorry this was a short one, but I felt the need to get the word out on this series so it gets more recognition then it has already.

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